Archives for posts with tag: Trivia Crack

As Lainey Feingold pointed out in her post “Today is the 6th annual Global Accessibility Awareness Day (GAAD). It’s a day to recognize that everyone uses technology — including those of us who can’t see a screen, hear a video, or hold a mouse. Accessibility means we can ALL participate fully in the digital world no matter how we use our computers, our iPhones, and the other technologies we all increasingly rely on. GAAD is a day to honor the tens of thousands of people across the globe working to make technology available to everyone.”

I celebrated early this week by Facetiming with three groups of students from the Florida School for the Blind. They were attentive, involved and asked good questions. One of my favorites was a ten year-old who asked: “Before electronics was there anything you could do for fun?” I reassured him there indeed was; reading books, listening to birds, playing cards and Scrabble, etc. But I also agreed there were lots more fun time wasters now with iPhones, etc. I just happened to mention Trivia Crack and there was a roar of approval from these tech savvy blind kids.

Later in the week when I was awakened at 1:00 AM by an owl making a racket for about twenty minutes I used the bird identification app on my iPhone to figure out it was probably a Barred Owl. I don’t know what it was so excited about, but at least I know who was excited.

On the actual day I’ll read and respond to a hundred emails, scroll through several hundred Facebook posts, skim eight newspapers, and check my Twitter feed a couple times. Then I’ll lie in bed and download the next book for one of my book clubs March by Geraldine Brooks and dive into it—all thanks to tech access.

Celebrate with me by Facebooking a picture that you describe or send a nasty-gram to a website that makes you do a CAPTCHA!

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After last year’s major push to get the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act celebrated locally by exhibits at libraries and a film showing, I decided this year to celebrate more privately by doing extra advocacy work and being mindful of all the access issues raised for me in a day of being an integral part of my community.

I started the day checking Facebook. Mainly inaccessible posts of pictures or pictures of words which Voiceover can’t read. But there were a few verbal updates and one quiz that was fun and accessible about what flower you’d be.  In case you’re wondering, I’m lavender. “Lavender: you have a soothing presence, people love your company and you always know how to make them feel better. You are thoughtful and considerate, often putting others first. You can make strangers feel at home. No matter how sad someone is feeling, you can always provide comfort and solace.” It was on Facebook, so it must be right, right?

Then I played a few rounds of trivia crack (mostly accessible these days), grabbed my first cup of coffee and settled in to check e-mail on my desktop computer. Windows 10 is working well for me, although I did have to pay $140 to upgrade my scanner to work with it.  “Free” Windows 10 wasn’t free in my book and I’m not sure it’s wonderful, but thanks to many people pushing Microsoft it is mostly accessible.

Next I talked to an intern from a law firm that is considering a class action kind of suit against a large company which has routinely ignored pleas for accessibility. If I told you who it was, I’d probably have to kill you, so don’t ask.  They became more interested in my stories when I was able to send them emails dating back five years pleading for access and offering to help with it.

I worked on arranging captioning and interpreting for the Schneider Disability Issues Forum in October at the university. I get to do 90% of the work for this event, but the university does provide clerical support and a couple of friends help pay for the speaker, captioner and interpreter.  I fear if I ever quit arranging it, it would cease to exist. In these lean times for universities in Wisconsin, nobody has time or energy to take on another worthwhile project.

I worked by email revising an article urging blind people to vote and describing accessible voting technology. The editor wanted me to clarify the sentence he’d highlighted. I’m not sophisticated enough to find highlighting using my screen reader (although I think it is possible). So he made a reasonable accommodation and pasted the offending sentence into an email for me to rewrite.

For lunch I microwaved a burrito (guessing at the time because instructions were not accessible). I punched in the time on my microwave which I’ve put bump dots on the 5, the 0, the start and stop keys. Flat screen technology has to be modified or equipped with voiceover to be accessible.  Bump dots (available at most hardware stores) are a cheap modification.

After lunch and a little nap I worked with a friend on a talk we’ll give in January about self-publishing. The accessibility pieces of it were my adding a sentence to the advertising about “If you have disability access needs, contact …” and my suggestion that we hold the talk in the community room of an assisted living facility.  I like breaking down barriers and retired folks may have the time and energy to write, so why not have the program there?

Then it was off to a book club for a great discussion of Traveling with Pomegranates by Sue Monk Kidd and her daughter Ann Kidd.  We were also deciding on reads for the rest of the year.  One gal really wanted us to read a book by a friend of hers which was not available in accessible format. I will contact the author and ask if they’ll give me an electronic copy (like their last draft of the manuscript). Some authors will do this and some won’t.

The 26th anniversary of the ADA closed for me with another round of Facebook, Twitter, Trivia Crack and starting a thriller from the public library on CDs.  On the news I noticed that several references were made to disability issues by various speakers at the Democratic National Convention.  After 25 years, disability issues are out of the closet; maybe after another 25 years they’ll be mainstream issues. It was an ordinary day, doing projects and having fun but little of it would be possible without disability accommodations. Happy birthday ADA; live long and prosper!

As often happens, the newest version of an app doesn’t work well with Voiceover. The August 12 update of Trivia Crack randomly bounced you out of the app if you used Voiceover, as blind users must.

There are not a lot of mainstream games on the iPhone that blind people can play, so this one is very popular with us. Since it’s also a very popular game with sighted users, it gives us a common bond. I admit I’m hooked; I’m at level 155. I regularly play about ten people, eight of whom are sighted. My opponents range in age from eighteen to eighty.

When version 2.2 installed itself and then crashed every time I opened it with Voiceover on, I sent a comment through their website and got back an automated response that they’d be in touch soon. I checked applevis.com and several other blind Trivia Crackers had experienced the same problem. I found Trivia Crack on Twitter and tweeted them. Then I Facebooked and asked Trivia Crackers, whether they use Voiceover or not, to complain.

I also sent the message to several lists of blind people and sent story ideas to wired Magazine and the BBC’s and NPR’s tech programs. I wanted to raise a mighty chorus! Apparently it wasn’t a story that tech magazines or tech shows found compelling. I think it’s hard for sighted people to realize how few choices of games we have since they’ve never had to think if a game is accessible. Users of Apple apps can’t go backward to the last version that was accessible.

No word came from the developer–not surprising to this cynic. In desperation, I called Apple Cares line and lodged a complaint. The gal I talked to thought if they get a lot of complaints they might reach out to the developer. I updated my lists and Facebook page with this message: “Call Apple Cares to complain. Their number is 800-275-2273. You’ll have to go through giving them your IMEI number and your phone number, etc. It takes about five minutes. Maybe if we work together we can stir up interest in fixing this.”

After two weeks I contacted a lawyer who specializes in disability rights, access issues, etc. and said I might be willing to pay for a couple hours of his time to write a letter to the developer. I’d think a legal letter would be worth paying attention to. After I found out it would cost me $400 to nudge them about access, I decided to wait. And wait… Stay tuned!