Blind people like to game too, but most mainstream games like Tetris and words with friends are inaccessible. Four years ago a developer Marty Schultz started developing Blindfold Games and now has over 80 games at the Apple store. www.blindfoldgames.org 8,000 copies of Blindfold Bowling have been downloaded, for example.

This week he was told by the Apple store he couldn’t market these games anymore but must crunch them down into a few apps. This would take a lot of work for very little profit. Blind people would lose the fun of gaming like their sighted peers enjoy and teachers of the blind would lose a fun way to teach their students how to use their iPads and iPhones.

As the developer’s blog made the blindness community aware of this horrible situation, advocacy efforts sprouted like mushrooms. Many posted their dismay on social media. An unknown number emailed or called Apple’s accessibility line. I contacted several reporters on the tech beat hoping to get the story out to the sighted world, but none responded.

But somewhere, somehow, something got to Apple and they changed their minds! In addition to celebrating the win by playing a few rounds of blindfold bowling, I’m wondering how to get Apple to give this developer an award. There are many more lucrative venues he could be marketing to, but I think he should be publicly thanked for making sure blind people can enjoy the fun of gaming too. If you have ideas, please let me know.

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