I was emailing with another blogger about what picture to use to represent a blog we were writing together. Somehow she (who is partially sighted) challenged me to come up with a picture that could represent a nonvisual example of perspective.  I suggested “a picture of someone in Wisconsin wearing shorts and someone in Florida wearing a winter coat with a sign saying “Fifty degrees F; it’s a matter of perspective.” I began to notice situations where a blind person’s perspective on a situation was radically different from a sighted person’s perspective. Examples follow.

This week, with a good bit of fanfare, Facebook announced that they were automatically captioning pictures that people post, so they’d be accessible to those of us who are blind. I eagerly checked my Facebook feed, which I’d swear is about 70% pictures. The automatic captions were like the following: “May be a picture of a person indoors”. “May be a picture of outdoors”. Now that is amazing, I agree that a computer can recognize pictures of objects and decide if it’s inside or outside, but it’s not a real game changer for me. I will still bug my friends to caption their own Facebook offerings with “beautiful sunset on Lake Superior” rather than their usual “Wow, look at this.” It’s all a matter of perspective, Facebook is quite pleased with themselves; I’d give them one star out of four.

Second example of perspective: Freading got back to me about their app not working with voiceover. They said thanks for the idea and we consider your case closed.  They’d heard my idea, probably passed it on to somebody in charge of keeping a list of good ideas and considered it settled. I want to read a Freading book and can’t using voiceover on my phone. For me, it won’t be done until I can read that book.  So I contacted the library access person who will contact Freading and see if as a purchaser of the software, the library gets further in requesting access. Another one star out of four from my perspective.

Frequent discussions in the disability communities where I hang out electronically involve what to do about able-bodied people calling us “inspirational” for all the wrong reasons: like how well someone uses a power wheelchair, instead of how qualified they’d be for the job they’re interviewing for. Disabled community reaction of irritation-rage; able-bodied community reaction of awe at the little things and hurt if irritation is expressed. This week I had this experience when I read a prayer out loud from a braille copy of a book and someone asked me to do it again next meeting because it was “so powerful” that I could read.  My irritation was aroused but I knew her well enough to know she meant no harm. Since I’d asked her to read several times, I just said “I guess it’s fair for you to ask me to read.”

Note to self after all these ruminations about perspective: next time someone pisses me off, perhaps I should put a lock on my mouth until I put myself in their shoes for at least ten seconds. Could be a lifesaver as the political season drones on!

 

 

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